New Juvenile Nonfiction Books July 2020

Check out these new Juvenile nonfiction books we just put out on the shelves! If you are interested, call, come in, or reserve a book online!

"What is an Election" by Caryn Jenner


Packed with facts, kids will love learning about elected leaders from around the world, from Barack Obama to Nelson Mandela, and how they came to power.


With this nonfiction politics book, children will learn about where and how democracy began and how it has developed over the years.


What is an Election? is a new Level 2 title in the engaging four-level DK Readers series, aimed at children who are beginning to learn to read. Developing a lifelong love of reading, DK Readers cover a vast range of fascinating subjects to support children as they learn to read.


DK Readers are assessed by both Fountas & Pinnell and Lexile levels, and are ideal for learning to read while building general knowledge. What is an Election? explores a topic that will inspire and educate children, encouraging reading for pleasure which is linked with improved reading and writing abilities, as well as a wider vocabulary and greater self-confidence.


"Year in Sports 2020" by Scholastic


The must-have guidebook for young sports fans is back with the latest news and features on the top athletes and sports moments from the past year.


Scholastic's annual Year in Sports returns with brand-new, exciting coverage of the past year's sporting events. This 2020 edition features colorful photographs from right in the action, completely updated facts and stats, plus special features on the X Games and other major sports events.


Read about all of the top athletes, championships, and legends. Featuring all your favorite stars in baseball, basketball, football, and more, this book is perfect for sports newbies, as well as the most devoted fans.


"Dancing Hands: How Teresa Carreño Played the Piano for President Lincoln" by Margarita Engle


The story of Teresa Carreño, a child prodigy who played piano for Abraham Lincoln.


As a little girl, Teresa Carreño loved to let her hands dance across the beautiful keys of the piano. If she felt sad, music cheered her up, and when she was happy, the piano helped her share that joy. Soon she was writing her own songs and performing in grand cathedrals. Then a revolution in Venezuela forced her family to flee to the United States. Teresa felt lonely in this unfamiliar place, where few of the people she met spoke Spanish. Worst of all, there was fighting in her new home, too — the Civil War.


Still, Teresa kept playing, and soon she grew famous as the talented Piano Girl who could play anything from a folk song to a sonata. So famous, in fact, that President Abraham Lincoln wanted her to play at the White House! Yet with the country torn apart by war, could Teresa’s music bring comfort to those who needed it most?


"Planting Stories: The Life of Librarian and Storyteller Pura Belpré" by Anika Aldamuy Denise


Follow la vida y legado of Pura Belpré, the first Puerto Rican librarian in New York City.


When she came to America in 1921, Pura carried the cuentos folklóricos of her Puerto Rican homeland. Finding a new home at the New York Public Library as a bilingual assistant, she turned her popular stories into libros and spread story seeds across the land. Today, these seeds have grown into a lush landscape as generations of children and cuentistas continue to share her stories and celebrate Pura’s legacy.


This portrait of the influential librarian, author, and puppeteer reminds us of the power of storytelling and the extraordinary woman who opened doors and championed bilingual literature.


"The Key From Spain: Flory Jagoda and Her Music" by Debbie Levy


When Flory's ancestors are forced to leave Spain during the time of the Spanish Inquisition, they take with them their two most precious possessions--the key to their old house and the Ladino language. When Flory flees Europe during World War II to begin a new life in the United States, she carries Ladino with her, along with her other precious possessions — her harmoniku and her music. But what of the key?


The story of Ladino singer, Flory Jagoda.


"Hey, Water!" by Antoinette Portis


Splash! A little girl plays a game of hide-and-seek with water, in this nonfiction picture book.


Hey, water! I know you! You're all around.


Join a young girl as she explores her surroundings and sees that water is everywhere. But water doesn't always look the same, it doesn't always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. Water can be a lake, it can be steam, it can be a tear, or it can even be a snowman.


As the girl discovers water in nature, in weather, in her home, and even inside her own body, water comes to life, and kids will find excitement and joy in water and its many forms.


"Science Comics: Crows, Genius Birds" by Kyla Vanderklugt


That's something to crow about! Learn all about these genius birds in Kyla Vanderklugt's Science Comics: Crows, the latest volume in First Second’s action-packed nonfiction graphic novel series for middle-grade readers!


Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic — dinosaurs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, robots, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty-year-old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!


Did you know that crows make their own tools, lead complex social lives, and never forget a human face? Scientists are just beginning to unlock the secrets of the crow's brain to discover how these avian Einsteins can be as smart as some primates, and even perform some of the same cognitive feats as human children! Crows have problem-solving skills that will make you you rethink what it means to be a bird brain!


"Llamas and the Andes" by Mary Pop Osborne


Track the facts about llamas and other animals of the Andes in this nonfiction companion to the bestselling Magic Tree House series!


When Jack and Annie came back from their adventure in Magic Tree House #34: Late Lunch with Llamas, they had lots of questions. Why do people raise llamas? What are llamas' closest relatives? How tall are the Andes mountains? What other animals live there? Find out the answers to these questions and more as Jack and Annie track the facts about llamas and the Andes.


Filled with up-to-date information, photographs, illustrations, and fun tidbits from Jack and Annie, the Fact Trackers are the perfect way for kids to find out more about the topics they discover in their favorite Magic Tree House adventures.


"The World of Weird Animals: Gross as a Snot Otter" by Jess Keating


The creators of Pink Is for Blobfish are back, and they've brought 17 of their most revolting friends: there are slippery, slimy snot otters, gulls that projectile-vomit on command, fish that communicate via flatulence, and chipmunks that cultivate healthy forests by pooping a trail of seeds wherever they go. But there's more to these skin-crawling creatures than meets the eye, and as zoologist Jess Keating explains, sometimes it's the very things that make us gag that allow these animals to survive in the wild.


Book descriptions brought to you by goodreads.com

4 views0 comments

(419) 826-2760

©2020 by SPL Children's Department. Proudly created with Wix.com