Classic Children Books Released in 1970!

Updated: Jul 3, 2020

The best kind of books are the ones that can be enjoyed during any era. The following 10 popular books were all published in 1970. Have you read all of these books? Let us know in the comments which ones are your favorites! Happy 50th Birthday!!


Summaries adapted from GoodReads.


"Frog and Toad Are Friends" by Arnold Lobel


From writing letters to going swimming, telling stories to finding lost buttons, Frog and Toad are always there for each other — just as best friends should be. Frog and Toad Are Friends is a Level Two I Can Read book, geared for kids who read on their own but still need a little help.


The classic Frog and Toad stories by Arnold Lobel have won numerous awards and honors, including a Newbery Honor (Frog and Toad Together), a Caldecott Honor (Frog and Toad are Friends), ALA Notable Children’s Book, Fanfare Honor List (The Horn Book), School Library Journal Best Children’s Book, and Library of Congress Children’s Book.


"Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH" by Robert C. O'Brien


Mrs. Frisby, a widowed mouse with four small children, must move her family to their summer quarters immediately, or face almost certain death. But her youngest son, Timothy, lies ill with pneumonia and must not be moved. Fortunately, she encounters the rats of NIMH, an extraordinary breed of highly intelligent creatures, who come up with a brilliant solution to her dilemma.


"Fantastic Mr. Fox" by Roald Dahl


Fantastic Mr. Fox is on the run! The three meanest farmers around are out to get him. Fat Boggis, squat Bunce, and skinny Bean have joined forces, and they have Mr. Fox and his family surrounded. What they don’t know is that they’re not dealing with just any fox Mr. Fox would never surrender. But only the most fantastic plan ever can save him now.


"Runaway Ralph" by Beverly Cleary


Ralph, the adventurous mouse, sets out for a children's summer camp on his motorcycle after being teased and chided by his family.


"The Summer of the Swans" by Betsy Byars


Winner of the Newbery Medal.


Sometimes you don't know what you love — until you almost lose it.


Sara's fourteenth summer was turning out to be the most confusing time of her life. Up until then, things had flowed smoothly, like the gliding swans on the lake. Now she wanted to fly away from everything — her beautiful older sister, her bossy Aunty Willie, her remote father, and, most of all, from herself.


But could she fly away from Charlie? She loved her younger brother in a way she couldn't understand, though sometimes she grew tired of his neediness. But when Charlie himself took flight, Sara suddenly knew what she had to do....


We also have 5 more honorable mentions that were not pictured above.



 "Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You?" by Dr. Seuss


Moo moo! Hoo hoo! Cock-a-doodle-doo! Oh, the wonderful sounds Mr. Brown can do. Now see if you can do them too! This fabulous book is ideal for teaching young children all about noises!


This delightful book forms part of the second stage in HarperCollins’ major Dr. Seuss rebrand program. With the relaunch of 10 more titles in August 2003, such all-time favorites as How the Grinch Stole Christmas!, Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? and Dr. Seuss’ Sleep Book boast bright new covers that incorporate much needed guidance on reading levels: Blue Back Books are for parents to share with young children, Green Back Books are for budding readers to tackle on their own, and Yellow Back Books are for older, more fluent readers to enjoy. Mr. Brown Can Moo! Can You? belongs to the Blue Back Book range.



"A Bargain for Frances" by Russell Hoban


Frances and Thelma are friends most of the time. Thelma always seems to get Frances into trouble. When she tricks Frances into buying her tea set, it's the last straw. Can Frances show her that it's better to lose a bargain than lose a friend?



"The Tiny Seed" by Eric Carle


In autumn, a strong wind blows flower seeds high in the air and carries them far across the land. One by one, many of the seeds are lost burned by the sun, fallen into the ocean, eaten by a bird. But some survive the long winter and, come spring, sprout into plants, facing new dangers trampled by playing children, picked as a gift for a friend. Soon only the tiniest seed remains, growing into a giant flower and, when autumn returns, sending its own seeds into the wind to start the process over again.

Eric Carle's eloquent text and brilliant collages turn the simple life cycle of a plant into an exciting story, a nature lesson, and an inspiring message of the importance of perseverance.



"A Story A Story," by Gail E. Haley


Winner of the Caldecott Medal.

Once, all the stories in the world belonged to Nyame, the Sky God. He kept them in a box beside his throne. But Ananse, the Spider man, wanted them and caught three sly creatures to get them. This story of how we got our own stories to tell is adapted from an African folktale.



"Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret" by Judy Blume


Margaret Simon, almost twelve, likes long hair, tuna fish, the smell of rain, and things that are pink. She’s just moved from New York City to Farbook, New Jersey, and is anxious to fit in with her new friends Nancy, Gretchen, and Janie. When they form a secret club to talk about private subjects like boys, bras, and getting their first periods, Margaret is happy to belong.


But none of them can believe Margaret doesn’t have religion, and that she isn’t going to the Y or the Jewish Community Center. What they don’t know is Margaret has her own very special relationship with God. She can talk to God about everything — family, friends, even Moose Freed, her secret crush.


Margaret is funny and real, and her thoughts and feelings are oh-so-relatable — you’ll feel like she’s talking right to you, sharing her secrets with a friend.

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